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Helicopter Instructor’s Handbook

The Helicopter Instructor’s Handbook is designed as a technical manual for applicants who are preparing for their flight instructor pilot certificate with a helicopter class rating. This handbook contains detailed coverage of aerodynamics, flight controls, systems, performance, flight maneuvers, emergencies, and aeronautical decision-making. Topics such as weather, navigation, radio navigation and communications, use of flight information publications, and regulations are available in other Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) publications. Pages 238   B
Airplane Flying Handbook

The Airplane Flying Handbook is designed as a technical  manual  to  introduce basic pilot skills and  knowledge  that  are  essential  for  piloting airplanes. It provides information on transition to other  airplanes  and  the  operation  of  various airplane  systems.  It  is  developed by the Flight Standards  Service,  Airman  Testing Standards Branch,  in  cooperation  with  various  aviation educators  and  industry. This  handbook  is developed to assist student pilots learning to fly airplanes. It is also beneficial to pilots who wish to  improve  their  flying  proficiency  and aeronautical knowledge, those pilots preparing for additional certificates or ratings. Pages 281  B
The Pilot’s Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge

Provides  basic  knowledge  that is essential for pilots. This handbook introduces pilots to the broad spectrum of knowledge that will be needed  as  they  progress  in  their  pilot training. Except  for  the  Code  of  Federal Regulations pertinent to civil aviation, most of  the  knowledge  areas  applicable  to pilot certification are presented. This handbook is useful  to  beginning  pilots,  as well as those pursuing  more  advanced  pilot  certificates. Pages 471  A
Student Pilot Guide

Before you begin flight training, it is important to have a basic understanding of the responsibilities, safety regulations, and issues applicable to such an endeavor. This includes the choice of a flight school, selected study materials, study habits, and the role of the instructor, student, and Federal
Aviation Administration (FAA).  Pages 27 C
Instrument Procedures Handbook

This handbook supersedes FAA-H-8261-1A,  Instrument  Procedures  Handbook, dated 2007. It is designed as a technical reference for all pilots who operate under instrument flight rules (IFR) in the National Airspace System (NAS). It expands and updates information contained in the FAA-H-8083-15B, Instrument Flying Handbook, and introduces advanced information for IFR  operations.  Instrument  flight instructors,  instrument  pilots,  and instrument  students  will  also  find  this handbook a valuable resource since it is used  as  a  reference  for  the  Airline Transport Pilot and Instrument Knowledge Tests. Pages 310  A
Instrument Flying Handbook

This Instrument Flying Handbook is designed for use by instrument flight instructors  and  pilots  preparing  for instrument rating tests. Instructors may find  this  handbook  a  valuable training aid  as  it  includes  basic  reference material  for  knowledge  testing  and instrument flight training. Other Federal Aviation  Administration  (FAA) publications should be consulted for more detailed information on related topics. Pages 371  A
Helicopter Flying Handbook

The Helicopter Flying Handbook is designed as a technical manual for applicants who are preparing for their private, commercial, or flight instructor pilot certificates with a helicopter class rating. Certificated flight instructors may find this handbook a valuable training aid, since detailed coverage of aerodynamics, flight controls, systems, performance, flight maneuvers, emergencies, and aeronautical decision-making is included. Topics such as weather, navigation, radio navigation and communications, use of flight information publications, and regulations are available in other Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) publications. Pages 198 B
Aviation Instructor’s Handbook

Designed for ground instructors, flight instructors, and aviation maintenance instructors, the Aviation Instructor’s Handbook was developed by the Flight Standards Service, Airman Testing Standards Branch, in cooperation with aviation educators and industry to help beginning instructors understand and apply the fundamentals of instruction. This handbook provides aviation instructors with up-to-date information on learning and teaching, and how to relate this information to the task of teaching aeronautical knowledge and skills to students. Experienced aviation instructors will also find the updated information useful for improving their effectiveness in training activities. While this handbook primarily uses the traditional term “student” to denote someone who is seeking certification in aviation, the accepted term in educational psychology is “learners.” Pages 228  B
AVIATION WEATHER

This Guide is published jointly by the FAA Flight Standards Service and the National Weather Service (NWS). Meteorology knowledge considered essential for most pilots. Pages 237   B
General Aviation Pilot’s Guide Preflight Planning, Weather Self-Briefings, and Weather Decision Making

This guide is intended to help general aviation (GA) pilots, especially those with relatively little weather-flying experience, develop skills in obtaining appropriate weather information, interpreting the data in the context of a specific flight, and applying the information and analysis to make safe weather flying decisions. Pages 37  C
FLIGHT AND GROUND INSTRUCTOR KNOWLEDGE TEST GUIDE

FAA-G-8082-7, dated October 2014, Flight and Ground Instructor Knowledge Test Guide, provides information for preparing you to take one or all of the following airman knowledge tests. This document supersedes all previously dated FAA-G-8082-7 versions.

Test Name Test Code
Fundamentals of Instructing ...................  FOI
Ground Instructor Basic    ....................... BGI
Ground Instructor Advanced   .................. AGI
Flight Instructor Airplane     ...................... FIA
Flight Instructor Rotorcraft Helicopter...... FRH
Flight Instructor Rotorcraft Gyroplane...... FRG
Flight Instructor Glider       ......................... FIG
Flight Instructor Airplane (added rating) ... AFA
Flight Instructor Helicopter (added rating)  HFA
Flight Instructor Gyroplane (added rating)..GFA
Flight Instructor Glider (added rating) ....... AFG
Flight Instructor Sport Airplane.................. SIA
Flight Instructor Sport Balloon................... SIB
Flight Instructor Sport Glider .................... SIG
Flight Instructor Sport Lighter-Than-Air (Airship) .... SIL
Flight Instructor Sport Powered Parachute..SIP
Flight Instructor Sport Weight-Shift-Control  SIW
Flight Instructor Sport Gyroplane ................. SIY
Military Competence Instructor.....................MCI Pages 194   B
INSTRUMENT RATING and INSTRUMENT INSTRUCTOR RATING
KNOWLEDGE TEST GUIDE


FAA-G-8082-13, dated October 2014, Instrument Rating Knowledge Test Guide, provides information for preparing you to take one or all of the following airman knowledge tests.

Test Name Test Code
Instrument Rating-Airplane............. IRA
Instrument Rating-Helicopter......... IRH
Instrument Rating-Foreign Pilot......IFP
Instrument Rating Canadian Conversion- Airplane.............. ICP
Flight Instructor Instrument Airplane.... FII
Flight Instructor Instrument-Helicopter... FIH
Flight Instructor Instrument-Airplane (Added Rating) .............AIF
Flight Instructor Instrument-Helicopter (Added Rating) .............HIF
Ground Instructor Instrument .... IGI   Pages 86   C

Plane Sense
General Aviation Information

Plane Sense introduces aircraft owners and operators, or prospective aircraft owners and operators, to basic information about the requirements involved in acquiring, owning, operating, and maintaining a private aircraft.  Pages 100  C
Aircraft Weight and Balance Handbook
FAA-H-8083-1A

Aircraft Weight and Balance Handbook, has been prepared in recognition of the importance of weight and balance technology in conducting safe and efficient flight. The objective of this handbook is twofold: to provide the Airframe and Powerplant Mechanic (A&P) with the method of determining the empty weight and empty-weight center of gravity (EWCG) of an aircraft, and to furnish the flight crew with information on loading and operating the aircraft to ensure its weight is within the allowable limit and the center of gravity (CG) is within the allowable range. Any time there is a conflict between the information in this handbook and specific information issued by an aircraft manufacturer, the manufacturer’s data takes precedence over information in this handbook. Occasionally, the word must or similar language is used where the desired action is deemed critical. The use of such language is not intended to add to, interpret, or relieve a duty imposed by Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR). Pages 100  C
Weight-Shift Control Aircraft
Flying Handbook

The Weight-Shift Control (WSC) Aircraft Flying Handbook introduces the basic pilot knowledge and skills that are essential for piloting WSC aircraft. It introduces pilots to the broad spectrum of knowledge that is needed as they progress in their pilot training. This handbook is for student pilots, as well as those pursuing more advanced pilot certificates. Student pilots learning to fl y WSC aircraft, certificated pilots preparing for additional WSC ratings or who desire to improve their flying proficiency and aeronautical knowledge, and commercial WSC pilots teaching WSC students how to fl y should find this handbook helpful. This book introduces the prospective pilot to the realm of WSC flight and provides information and guidance to all WSC pilots in the performance of various maneuvers and procedures.
Pages 280   B
Balloon Flying Handbook

This Balloon Flying Handbook introduces the basic pilot knowledge and skills that are essential for piloting balloons. It introduces pilots to the broad spectrum of knowledge that will be needed as they progress in their pilot training. This handbook is for student pilots, as well as those pursuing more advanced pilot certificates.

Student pilots learning to fly balloons, certificated pilots preparing for additional balloon ratings or who desire to improve their flying proficiency and aeronautical knowledge, and commercial balloon pilots teaching balloon students how to fly should find this handbook helpful. This book introduces the prospective pilot to the realm of balloon flight and provides information and guidance to all balloon pilots in the performance of various balloon maneuvers and procedures.
Pages 252   B
Glider Flying Handbook

The Glider Flying Handbook is designed as a technical manual for applicants who are preparing for glider category rating and for currently certificated glider pilots who wish to improve their knowledge. Certificated flight instructors will find this handbook a valuable training aid, since detailed coverage of aeronautical decision-making, components and systems, aerodynamics, flight instruments, performance limitations, ground operations, flight maneuvers, traffic patterns, emergencies, soaring weather, soaring techniques, and cross-country flight is included. Topics such as radio navigation and communication, use of flight information publications, and regulations are available in other Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) publications. Pages 268 B
How to Obtain a Good Weather Briefing

A good weather briefing begins with developing a  total  awareness  of  the  overall  big  picture before obtaining a detailed or standard briefing. Many  pilots  start  by  monitoring  weather patterns through commercial television, such as The Weather Channel, several days before the flight. The day or evening before the flight, pilots  may  wish  to  obtain  an  outlook  briefing from Flight Service or electronically from  a Direct User Access Terminal (DUAT) vendor, or they may choose to download weather and forecast charts from the Internet. (When using DUATs, don’t hesitate to contact Flight Service to clarify any information you do not fully understand.) As close to departure time as possible, call Flight Service or log on to DUAT for a standard briefing. (Of course, you can also access high-quality weather products on the Internet or via other sources, but first make sure that the menu of products is suitable for aviation use and the products are current.) If you obtain a standard briefing several hours before the flight or when the weather is questionable, it is a good practice to call an FSS for an abbreviated briefing just before takeoff. Pages 16   C
Flying Light Twins Safely

The major difference between flying a light twin and a single-engine airplane is knowing how to manage the flight if one  engine  loses  power. Safe  flight with  one  engine  inoperative  (OEI) requires an understanding of the basic aerodynamics  involved  as  well  as proficiency in single-engine flight. This booklet  deals  extensively  with  the numerous aspects of OEI flight. You mus t remember,  however,  not  to place undue emphasis on mastery of OEI flight as the sole key to flying light twins safely.
Pages 12   C
Proficiency and the Private Pilot

Proficiencyis defined as the state of art of being proficient; performing in a given art, skill, or branch of learning with expert correctness; adept,  skillful.  Pages 8   C
Aeronautical Information Manual (AIM)

Basic Flight Information and ATC Procedures. This manual is designed to provide the aviation community with basic flight information and ATC procedures for use in the National Airspace System (NAS) of the United States. An international version called the Aeronautical Information Publication contains parallel information, as well as specific information on the international airports for use by the international community. This manual contains the fundamentals required in order to fly in the United States NAS. It also contains items of interest to pilots concerning health and medical facts, factors affecting flight safety, a pilot/controller glossary of terms used in the ATC System, and information on safety, accident, and hazard reporting. Pages 738  A
Information For Banner Tow Operations
This publication is presented as an information guide for banner tow operations, to promote safe operations through careful preparation and planning. For preparation and planning, administrative concerns are also addressed.
FAA investigations of aerial advertising/banner towing accidents have revealed that the majority of the accidents are associated with one or more of the following circumstances: the banner pickup maneuver, entangled or snarled banner towlines, or loss of engine power. An analysis of banner tow accidents has revealed the following information
  Pages 25   C
Density Altitude

Although density altitude is not a common  subject  for  “hangar flying” discussions, pilots need to understand  this  topic. Density altitude  has  a  significant  (and inescapable) influence on aircraft and  engine  performance,  so every  pilot  needs  to  thoroughly understand  its  effects. Hot, high, and humid weather conditions can cause a routine takeoff or landing to become an accident in less time than it takes to tell about it. Pages 8   C
On Landings Part III

The first two books in this three-part series discuss undershoots, hard landings, bounced landings, go-round’s, and other landing issues. This document focuses on other landing challenges, including avoidance of gear-up landings, handling landing gear emergencies, landing on wet or ice-contaminated runways, and landing at night.
Pages 20   C
On Landings Part II

Having reviewed the material in Part I of this On Landings series, now we will look at two kinds of landing accidents that are complementary.” By that, we mean that, in some cases, “If the first one doesn’t get you, the second one will.” These accidents are landing long and the poorly executed go-around.
Pages 16  C
On Landings Part I

Being a safe pilot means combining your working knowledge of aviation with current skills and experience
-tempered by good judgment. One important phase of flying skill is the landing. Landing phase accidents are responsible for nearly half of all general aviation accidents. By fortifying your knowledge of the “whys” and “wherefores” of approach and landing accidents, you can become a safer pilot. In this pamphlet, we will look at undershooting and cross-control stalls-the kinds of accidents that can happen before you reach the runway. Also, we will look at hard landings, porpoising, and loss of directional control
-problems encountered after reaching the runwa
y. Pages 28   C
Wind Shear

Wind shear is a change in wind speed and/or direction over a short distance. It can occur either horizontally or vertically and is most often associated with strong temperature inversions or density gradients. Wind shear can occur at high or low altitude. Note: This document discusses only low-altitude wind shear.
Pages 12   C
Thunderstorms - Don’t Flirt...Skirt ‘Em

This booklet offers a review of thunderstorm hazards along with tips for avoiding this kind of weather.
Pages 8   C
Aeronautical Decision Making

FAA  Advisory  Circular  60-22  on Aeronautical Decision Making (FAA Advisory Circular 60-22) states that ADM is a systematic approach to the mental process used by all involved in aviation to consistently determine the best course of action for a given set of circumstances. What  does  that  really  mean?  From  the moment  your  feet  hit  the  floor  in  the morning until the key is safely back in your pocket at the end of each flight, you as the pilot (or crew member) have a never-ending series of decisions to make. This process begins long before the master is switched on. The process of good ADM is a continuous flow of information in and actions out. This document describes an effective way to manage this information flow. Pages 8 C
SEAPLANE, SKI-PLANE, and FLOAT/SKI - EQUIPPED HELICOPTER
OPERATIONS HANDBOOK

This operational handbook introduces the basic skills necessary for piloting seaplanes, ski-planes, and helicopters equipped with floats or skis. It is developed by the Flight Standards Service, Airman Testing Standards Branch, in cooperation with various aviation educators and industry.

This handbook is primarily intended to assist pilots who already hold private or commercial certificates and who are learning to fly seaplanes, ski-planes, or helicopters equipped for water or ski operations. It is also beneficial to rated seaplane pilots who wish to improve their proficiency, pilots preparing for flights using ski equipped aircraft, and flight instructors engaged in the instruction of both student and transitioning pilots. It introduces the future seaplane or ski-plane pilot to the realm of water operations and cold weather operations, and provides information on the performance of procedures required for the addition of a sea class rating in airplanes. Information on general piloting skills, aeronautical knowledge, or flying techniques not directly related to water or cold weather operations are beyond the scope of this book, but are available in other Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) publications. Pages 15  C
Pilot and Air Traffic Controller
Guide to Wake Turbulence

This Pilot and Air Traffic Controller Guide to Wake Turbulence is a comprehensive document covering all the factors leading to a shared awareness and understanding of wake turbulence. A review of the history of wake turbulence studies, from the introduction of turbo-jet aircraft to today’s environment, is the starting point. A description of typical accidents and incidents allows a look at trends and lessons learned from history. With history as a basis, a thorough description is given of the wake-turbulence hazard. This includes the formation, effects, and dissipation of the wake vortex phenomenon. A description is given of our ability to predict, detect, and measure the wake-turbulence hazard. This includes future planned improvements in these areas.
Pages 40  C
Air traffic control procedures and phraseology 2014

This order prescribes air traffic control procedures and phraseology for use by personnel providing air traffic control services. Controllers are required to be familiar with the provisions of this order that pertain to their operational responsibilities and to exercise their best judgment if they encounter situations not covered by it.
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Commercial Pilot Knowledge Guide

The knowledge tests are designed to test your knowledge in many subject areas.

If you are pursuing a commercial pilot certificate, you should review this FAA test.
Pages 96   C

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