ONE-MINUTE WEATHER
The most recent one minute updated weather broadcast received by a pilot from an uncontrolled airport

OPERATIONAL
(See DUE REGARD.)

OPERATIONS SPECIFICATIONS [ICAO]
The authorizations, conditions and limitations associated with the air operator certificate and subject to the conditions in the operations manual.

OPPOSITE DIRECTION AIRCRAFT
Aircraft are operating in opposite directions when: a. They are following the same track in reciprocal directions; or b. Their tracks are parallel and the aircraft are flying in reciprocal directions; or c. Their tracks intersect at an angle of more than 135.

OPTION APPROACH
An approach requested and conducted by a pilot which will result in either a touch-and-go, missed approach, low approach, stop-and-go, or full stop landing. (See CLEARED FOR THE OPTION.) (Refer to AIM.)

OR COMMON ROUTE
Typically the portion of a RNAV STAR between the en route transition end point and the runway transition start point; however, the common route may only consist of a single point that joins the en route and runway transitions.

OR OUTER FIX
An adapted fix along the converted route of flight, prior to the meter fix, for which crossing times are calculated and displayed in the metering position list.

ORGANIZED TRACK SYSTEM
A series of ATS routes which are fixed and charted; i.e., CEP, NOPAC, or flexible and described by NOTAM; i.e., NAT TRACK MESSAGE.

OTR
(See OCEANIC TRANSITION ROUTE.)

OTS
(See ORGANIZED TRACK SYSTEM.)

OUTER COMPASS LOCATOR
(See COMPASS LOCATOR.)

OUTER FIX
A general term used within ATC to describe fixes in the terminal area, other than the final approach fix. Aircraft are normally cleared to these fixes by an Air Route Traffic Control Center or an Approach Control Facility. Aircraft are normally cleared from these fixes to the final approach fix or final approach course.

OUTER FIX TIME
A calculated time to depart the outer fix in order to cross the vertex at the ACLT. The time reflects descent speed adjustments and any applicable delay time that must be absorbed prior to crossing the meter fix.

OUTER MARKER
A marker beacon at or near the glideslope intercept altitude of an ILS approach. It is keyed to transmit two dashes per second on a 400 Hz tone, which is received aurally and visually by compatible airborne equipment. The OM is normally located four to seven miles from the runway threshold on the extended centerline of the runway. (See INSTRUMENT LANDING SYSTEM.) (See MARKER BEACON.) (Refer to AIM.)

OVER
My transmission is ended; I expect a response.

OVERHEAD
(See OVERHEAD MANEUVER.)

OVERHEAD MANEUVER
A series of predetermined maneuvers prescribed for aircraft (often in formation) for entry into the visual flight rules (VFR) traffic pattern and to proceed to a landing. An overhead maneuver is not an instrument flight rules (IFR) approach procedure. An aircraft executing an overhead maneuver is considered VFR and the IFR flight plan is cancelled when the aircraft reaches the “initial point” on the initial approach portion of the maneuver. The pattern usually specifies the following: a. The radio contact required of the pilot. b. The speed to be maintained. c. An initial approach 3 to 5 miles in length. d. An elliptical pattern consisting of two 180 degree turns. e. A break point at which the first 180 degree turn is started. f. The direction of turns. g. Altitude (at least 500 feet above the conventional pattern). h. A “Roll-out” on final approach not less than 1/4 mile from the landing threshold and not less than 300 feet above the ground.